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Things Worth Burying

“Burning the cabin was about enforcing some futile law. Its purpose was to put you in your place. The wreckage would never leave the bush. The remnants would be left to rust and degrade, but the structure was gone, as though all they wanted was to destroy the roof over your head, prove that the vast crown land belonged to them and not you. They wanted to take away your sense of security. This was the attitude that my father and grandfather had rallied against their whole lives. The unseen turn of the Toronto machine. Listen close, my father would say, and you can hear their arrogance blowing across the land, threatening your livelihood. To them, we’re nothing but a pile of moose shit scraped off a boot. Remember this when they come to you smiling, full of promises, asking for your vote.”

A Stab at Life

Available for pre-order NOW – Pub Date: April 1, 2020 A series of murders in Montreal park near the Gursky Memorial Hospital have Nurse Annie Linton and Detective Gilles Bellechasse hopping. Suspects include a vigilante group fighting drug dealers, a jealous husband, competing drug dealers, and a mysterious woman of whom nude drawings turn up… Read more »

Free of ‘Incurable’ Cancer

Available for pre-order NOW – Pub Date: April 1, 2020 Diagnosed with incurable cancer in 2009 with a maximum six-year life expectancy, the author chronicles her journey through traditional and alternative treatments to complete remission. Without rejecting traditional treatment (i.e., chemo or radio therapies), she refused to be an object to be treated by others…. Read more »

CHARGING AHEAD

Hydro-Québec manages one of the largest power grids on the continent. It is among the most profitable, the least expensive and the greenest. With a stunning renewable energy rate of 99.8 percent, Quebec has two-generation advance on places like California and Ontario. Combining a reporters’ style with thought, philosophy and a touch of humour, Jean-Benoît… Read more »

Exile Blues

“It’s the novel Malcolm X might have written had he not suffered martyrdom.” —George Elliott Clarke, 7th Parliamentary Poet Laureate (2016 & 2017) When Preston Downs, Jr., aka Prez, slides down the emergency chute onto the frozen tarmac at the Montreal airport, little does he know that never would he return home to Washington D.C…. Read more »

Why No Confederate Statues in Mexico

The Civil War divides the United States. Millions, including the president, wish to maintain monuments to generals like Robert E. Lee. Referred to as “Knights” in Gone with the Wind,” some generals earned their bona fides by murdering blacks, Mexicans, and Native Americans During the Battle of Chapultepec in 1847, Robert E. Lee fought children,… Read more »

Israel, A Beachhead in the Middle East

Available June 1, 2019 Pre-order now One US military leader has called Israel “the intelligence equivalent of five CIAs.” An Israeli cabinet minister likens his country to “the equivalent of a dozen US aircraft carriers,” while the Jerusalem Post defines Israel as the executive of a “superior Western military force that” protects “America’s interests in… Read more »

Fog

Winner: The Miramichi Reader’s 2019 “Very Best Fiction Award” A small plane was blown up in an act of sabotage several years ago over Eastern Quebec, Canada. All the passengers and crew were killed. The incident was quickly analyzed and termed a mechanical failure. The case was declared cold, in a rush. What intrigue and… Read more »

The Daughters’ Story

Available May 1, 2019 Pre-order now Nadine is banished to a home for unwed mothers in 1950. She’s 15. Her baby daughter, whose father is shrouded in secrecy, is put up for adoption without her permission. Vowing to reunite one day with her daughter, she cuts all ties with her dysfunctional Irish and French-Canadian Catholic… Read more »

Through the Mill

“Women do not go on strike and do not get drunk.” — John A. Rose, cigar manufacturer, explaining to a Royal Commision why textile manufacturers should hire women, 1888. Girls and women were essential to industrialization in Canada, particularly in the cotton textile industry, which was concentrated in Quebec. In 1891, for example, more than… Read more »