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Songs Upon the Rivers

“the place to which the French came (…) the hardness of the Indians they must have embrothered to be able to settle and have them as conspirators in the rebellion against contrarious potent churly England.” — Jack Kerouac, Visions of Gerard “a major undertaking … a valuable contribution,” Canada’s History Long before the Davy Crocketts,… Read more »

The History of Montréal

Montreal is one of those unique cities at the crossroads of history. Paul-André Linteau’s The History of Montréal provides essential background for both Montrealers and all those who will converge on the city to celebrate the 375th anniversary of the founding of Montreal in 1642. Montreal has always intrigued. For centuries, people have written, talked,… Read more »

Storming the Old Boys’ Citadel

“Women” and “architecture” were once mutually exclusive terms. In an 1891 address, Louise Blanchard Bethune declared, “it is hardly safe to assert” that a connection even exists between the two words. Some women didn’t agree.

Rwanda and the New Scramble for Africa

“… essential reading.” Edward S. Herman An accepted narrative holds that horrible Rwandan Hutu génocidaires planned and executed a satanic scheme to eliminate nearly a million Tutsis after a mysterious plane crash killed the former president of Rwanda on April 6, 1994. Yet former UN Secretary General Boutros-Ghali says, “the Rwandan genocide was 100 percent… Read more »

The Adventures of Radisson 1

Spring 1651: a young man from Paris lands in Trois-Rivières on the St. Lawrence River. Within weeks, the course of his life changes drastically. Iroquois braves capture him. Pierre-Esprit Radisson, then 15 years old, begins a new life. Canoeing rivers and lakes and portaging over mountains, Radisson’s captors take him to distant lands. First they… Read more »

21 Days in October

“… an excellent book for discussion in social science and history lessons that relate to Quebec. Favre’s writing moves at a quick pace, and expertly conveys many ideas and issues.” Caroline Chung, Resource Links, Connecting Classrooms, Librairies & Canadian Learning Resources. It’s before dawn in Montreal on October 16, 1970. Gaétan is finishing his shift… Read more »

The Riot that Never Was

“The Riot that Never Was provides a striking portrayal of mid-nineteenth-century Montreal: the vigorous debates that raged in Patriote and Conservative newspapers, the hot fighting during elections that often degenerated into open conflict between the Canadiens, the Irish, and the English, and the recurrent epidemics like the cholera epidemic in 1832. (…) Jackson brilliantly establishes… Read more »

A People’s History of Quebec

This lively guide to Quebec history tells the fascinating story of the settlement of the St. Lawrence River Valley over nearly 500 years. But it also tells of the Montreal and Quebec-based explorers and traders who travelled, mapped, and inhabited most of North America, and embrothered the peoples they met. Combining vast research and great… Read more »

America’s Gift

The world was never the same after 1492. The encounter of two “old worlds” gave rise to a truly new world on both sides of the Atlantic. America’s Gift recalls the full significance of the contact made between Europe and the Americas, mistakenly called the “New World.” As Columbian intellectual German Arciniegas wrote: “From questions… Read more »

The Journals of Pierre-Louis de Lorimier 1777-1795

The founder of Cape Girardeau, Missouri, Pierre-Louis de Lorimier, a French Canadian from the Montreal area, left three journals written between 1777 and 1795. The three texts meticulously transcribed are now published together for the first time in the original French and in English and richly commented. Lorimier’s journals are an invaluable contribution to understanding… Read more »