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Through the Mill

Now Available “Women do not go on strike and do not get drunk.” — John A. Rose, cigar manufacturer, explaining to a Royal Commision why textile manufacturers should hire women, 1888. Girls and women were essential to industrialization in Canada, particularly in the cotton textile industry, which was concentrated in Quebec. In 1891, for example,… Read more »

Richmond, Now and Then

Some liken formal histories to four-lane highways. Nick Fonda answers with a meandering country road, quietly charming, with a human face. If all politics is local, so all history is local… and anecdotal. As the great urban thinker Jane Jacobs said, anecdotes are the only real evidence because they come from stories people tell. Though… Read more »

Rhapsody in Quebec

Foreword by Toula Drimonis “intelligent, funny, often ironic…” Publishers Weekly Born in Hungary in 1975, Akos Verboczy moved to Montreal, Quebec at the age of 11 with his sister and mother, an esthetician, who learned that in Canada women were willing to pay a fortune ($20) to have their leg hair brutally ripped out. His… Read more »

The Prophetic Anti-Gallic Letters

The Anti-Gallic Letters by Adam Thom were published in book form in 1836. They are based on Thom’s editorials in the Montreal Herald written under the nom de plume “Camillus” between September 1835 and January 1836. They were never reprinted despite the importance of the people for whom Adam Thom was the public voice. These people… Read more »

Iron Bars and Bookshelves

The Morrin Centre is at the heart of Quebec City’s history. It once housed Quebec’s common jail, the Presbyterian-run Morrin College, and the scholarly activities of the Literary and Historical Society of Quebec. Today, it is home to the city’s main English-language cultural centre and library. The colourful stories of each of these institutions reveal… Read more »

The Adventures of Radisson 3

Courage, diplomacy, love, and conspiracy make for an action-packed adventure in a little-known past. This third instalment of the series continues Radisson’s adventures with the Jesuits and the Iroquois. Mastering the Iroquois language and customs, Radisson leads a mission of French traders and Jesuits to Onondaga in an attempt to build alliances and trade for… Read more »

Hanging Fred and a Few Others

Frederick Coburn (1871-1960) was arguably Canada’s best-known painter at the peak of his career. Nick Fonda revisits Coburn’s work providing charming new insight into the painter and his surroundings. His method includes casting an inquisitive gaze on other accomplished artists who have followed quite unusual paths as they responded to the same muse that moved… Read more »

The Question of Separatism

Baraka Books proudly offers readers a new edition of her third, least-known book to mark that anniversary. Undeniably a genius on urban issues, Jane Jacobs also grappled with the question of nations and political sovereignty. Out of print since the mid 80s, The Question of Separatism, Quebec and the struggle over sovereignty now includes a… Read more »

21 Days in October

“… an excellent book for discussion in social science and history lessons that relate to Quebec. Favre’s writing moves at a quick pace, and expertly conveys many ideas and issues.” Caroline Chung, Resource Links, Connecting Classrooms, Librairies & Canadian Learning Resources. It’s before dawn in Montreal on October 16, 1970. Gaétan is finishing his shift… Read more »

I Hate Hockey

“the literary equivalent of a sudden death shootout”, The Hockey Writers. “McCambridge’s excellent translation retains the prolific Québécois author’s tight narrative and biting voice… powerful.” Publishers Weekly, April 2012, More.. “I hate hockey!” is the first and last sentence in this novel that offers a great take on our love-hate relationship with hockey. Narrator Antoine… Read more »